Georgia Single Sideband Association
Serving Amateur Radio since 1960



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the Georgia Single Sideband Net, nightly on

3975 kHz at 2300Z





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Upcoming Hamfests

Huntsville Hamfest
Huntsville, AL
August 17

MORE

Stone Mountain Hamfest
Lawrenceville, GA
November 2-3

MORE

 

GSSA Annual On-The-Air Meeting Was Wednesday

The yearly business meeting of the GSSA was held on the air in place of the regular net. The current roster of officers were re-elected by acclamation. For information on who those officers are, scroll down to the left under "net officers". Don't forget to
VoteForFrank in 2020!

 

 

Ham Radio for Emergency Communications

Clay Today report amateur radio technology is still the modern way to communicate after an emergency

The newspaper says:

Amateur radio operators know that in a pinch a pair of Slinkys can be stretched between two trees as an antenna. But in the aftermath of a disaster, natural or otherwise, that kind of creativity often can bring some relief and comfort to the most-desperate situations.

Members of the Clay County Amateur Radio Operating Club and Orange Park Amateur Radio Club hosted their “Introduction to Amateur Radio” last weekend at Orange Park High. Now that hurricane season is here, the group sponsored an open house to show their equipment and experience is ready for the worst.

“It may be old technology, but it’s very necessary,” said Scott Roberts KK4ECR, a coordinator with the local Amateur Radio Emergency Service. Read the full story here.

-Southgate ARC

 

 

Nature Article Suggest a “Grand Solar Minimum” Lies Ahead


A juried research paper in Nature, “Oscillations of the baseline of solar magnetic field and solar irradiance on a millennial timescale,” suggests that a “grand solar minimum” — similar to the legendary “Maunder Minimum” — is approaching, starting as early as next year and lasting for three solar cycles. That would be bad news for HF enthusiasts, who are already struggling with marginal conditions.

As the paper’s abstract explains, “Recently discovered long-term oscillations of the solar background magnetic field associated with double dynamo waves generated in inner and outer layers of the Sun indicate that the solar activity is heading in the next three decades (2019–2055) to a Modern grand minimum similar to Maunder one.”

As propagation buff and contester Frank Donovan, W3LPL, observed, “It’s very uncertain if this forecast is correct, but as usual the forecasts of the next solar cycle are all over the map. Let’s hope these scientists are wrong.”

-ARRL Letter

 

 

What happens in Europe often bleeds over to here.....-ed.


Two Meters: Re-Allocation?

Radio Amateurs of Canada has received several requests for more information in response to reports on some websites and discussions on email lists of a proposal to reallocate 144 MHz -146MHz from the Amateur Radio Service to the Aeronautical Mobile Service.

The following has been prepared by Bryan Rawlings VE3QN RAC’s representative at the World Radio Conference and the domestic and International meetings leading up to that meeting.

Glenn MacDonell
President
Radio Amateurs of Canada

 

Two Meters: Re-Allocation?

There is concern – understandably – in the amateur community over a French proposal to re-allocate 144 – 146 MHz to the aeronautical navigation service to accommodate the growing number of aircraft employing new navigation tracking and communication aids.

Here is a brief summary of what and where this proposal is …

The French administration have proposed a new primary allocation to the aeronautical mobile service in 144 to 146 MHz which is the entirety of the amateur two-metre band in ITU Region 1 (Europe, the Mid-East and Africa). Their proposal was most recently considered at a meeting in Prague of a subcommittee of the Conseil Europeen des Postes et Radiocommunication (CEPT). The CEPT comprises 48 European states.

What is under consideration specifically is that an agenda item to this effect be included for the World Radiocommunication Conference tentatively planned for 2023. The WRC-23 agenda will be decided at the conclusion of the next WRC which begins October 28 th in Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt.

The International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) was present as an observer at the Prague meeting and energetically opposed the French proposal. In the event, only Germany among the delegates opposed the French proposal. The issue will now be taken up at a higher level CEPT meeting in August. Belgium has apparently joined Germany in opposition. Should the number of administrations opposing the French proposal reach eight the proposal will fail to move forward. The IARU and European amateurs are now actively seeking the support of other administrations to oppose the French proposal.

Formally, the proposal is not on the agenda of any other regional groups preparing for WRC-19. RAC has made known to our regulator that we support the IARU’s opposition to the French proposal and its actions to defend amateur radio’s worldwide primary allocation and that we would oppose any similar proposal for re-allocation in Region 2 (the Americas). The Comisión Interamericana de Telecomunicaciones (CITEL) of the Organization of American States will meet in Ottawa in mid-August. The IARU will again be an observer and RAC will be represented in the Canadian delegation.

This issue is a clear illustration of the importance of amateurs and their national associations being vigilant and taking part in the regional and international regulatory conferences which can determine the fate of our most-cherished amateur bands. For a more-complete description of these processes read the article “ The Importance of Showing Up” in the May-June 2019 issue of The Canadian Amateur.

Bryan Rawlings VE3QN
3 July 2019
Radio Amateurs of Canada

-SouthgateARC

 

 

Now We Wait.....

ARRL Technician Enhancement Proposal

The FCC invited public comments on ARRL's 2018 Petition for Rule Making, now designated as RM-11828, which asks the FCC to expand HF privileges for Technician licensees to include limited phone privileges on 75, 40, and 15 meters, plus RTTY and digital mode privileges on 80, 40, 15, and 10 meters. Interested parties had until April 15 to comment. The Technician enhancement proposals stemmed from the recommendations of the ARRL Board of Directors' Entry-Level License Committee, which explored various initiatives and gauged member opinions in 2016 and 2017.

"This action will enhance the available license operating privileges in what has become the principal entry-level license class in the Amateur Service," ARRL said in its Petition. "It will attract more newcomers to Amateur Radio, it will result in increased retention of licensees who hold Technician Class licenses, and it will provide an improved incentive for entry-level licensees to increase technical self-training and pursue higher license class achievement and development of communications skills."

Specifically, ARRL proposes to provide present and future Technician licensees:

- Phone privileges at 3.900 to 4.000 MHz, 7.225 to 7.300 MHz, and 21.350 to 21.450 MHz

- RTTY and digital privileges in current Technician allocations on 80, 40, 15, and 10 meters.

Under the ARRL plan, the maximum HF power level for Technician operators would remain at 200 W PEP. ARRL's petition points to the need for compelling incentives not only to become a radio amateur in the first place, but then to upgrade and further develop skills.

The ARRL Board's ad hoc Entry-Level License Committee, which recommended the proposals, received significant input from ARRL members via more than 8,000 survey responses.

Now numbering some 384,500 licensees, Technicians comprise more than half of the US Amateur Radio population. ARRL stressed in its petition the urgency of making the license more attractive to newcomers, in part to improve upon science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education, "that inescapably accompanies a healthy, growing Amateur Radio Service."

ARRL said its proposal is critical to develop improved operating skills, increasing emergency preparedness participation, improving technical self-training, and boosting overall growth in the Amateur Service, which has remained nearly inert at about 1% per year.


-ARRL

 

Radio History: A Century of Amateur Radio and the ARRL

Look at this "history" of ham radio through the eyes of the ARRL, an interesting read!

 

Check into our sister net, the Georgia Traffic and Emergency Net
nightly at 7:15 PM Eastern on 3982.5 mHz
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Georgia Cracker Radio Club
Meets on 3995 mornings at 7




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