Georgia Single Sideband Association
Serving Amateur Radio since 1960



Check into the voice of the Association,
the Georgia Single Sideband Net, nightly on

3975 kHz at 2300Z





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Upcoming Hamfests

Dalton Hamfest
Dalton, GA
February 23

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CARS Swapmeet
Savannah, GA
April 27

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Calhoun Hamfest
Resaca, GA
April 27

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Wiregrass ARC Spring Tailgate
Headland, AL
April 27

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Atlanta Hamfest
Marietta, GA
June 1

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Huntsville Hamfest
Huntsville, AL
August 17

MORE

More to come!



"Are We Entering a Maunder Minimum?"

is the topic of the January 31 episode of the "ARRL The Doctor is In" podcast. Listen...and learn!

 

 

 

 

Riley Hollingsworth, K4ZDH, to Oversee Volunteer Monitors Development and Implementation


Riley Hollingsworth, K4ZDH, will oversee the development and implementation phases of ARRL's new Volunteer Monitors (VM) program, which will replace the Official Observers (OO) program. Hollingsworth, who once handled Amateur Radio enforcement for the FCC, has stepped down as ARRL Atlantic Division Vice Director to avoid any appearance of a conflict of interest. The development phase of the program is already under way. Approved by the ARRL Board of Directors last July, the Volunteer Monitors will work in cooperation with the FCC. Volunteers trained and vetted by ARRL will monitor the amateur bands for possible instances of misconduct or to recognize exemplary on-air operation. Cases of flagrant violations or noncompliance will be directed to the FCC for action, in accordance with FCC guidelines. The program, which aims to re-energize Amateur Radio enforcement efforts, was proposed by the FCC following the closure of several FCC regional offices and reductions in field staff.

Hollingsworth has identified three phases to the program -- development, solicitation and training, and implementation. The development phase will include drafting a mission statement, clearly defining ARRL's and the FCC's requirements and needs as part of the program, drafting a Volunteer Manager job description, and developing a training manual for volunteers.

The solicitation and training phase will involve identifying the geographical locations where volunteer monitors will be most needed, soliciting applications, and screening applicants. Current Official Observers will be invited to apply for appointment as Volunteer Monitors (VMs). The ARRL Board has expressed its appreciation to the OOs for their dedicated volunteer service over the years. ARRL officials estimate that it will take 9 - 12 months before the first Volunteer Monitors begin filing reports.

-ARRL Letter

 

 

 

 

US Amateur Radio Population Grows Slightly in 2018


The US Amateur Radio population once again grew by about 1%, based upon 2017 and 2018 year-end FCC database statistics provided by Joe Speroni, AH0A. The 755,430 total licensees represent nearly 7,300 more license holders than those that were in the database at the end of 2017. Nearly 51% of the Amateur Radio population in the US -- 384,145 -- hold a Technician license. Generals are second with 175,949, and Amateur Extras number 147,369. Advanced and Novice licensee populations continue to decline, with 39,607 Advanced and 8,360 Novices, as the FCC no longer issues Advanced or Novice licenses. A more significant statistic is 31,576 new FCC licenses last year, although that's 620 fewer than came aboard in 2017.

"New amateur licenses granted by FCC are down 2% over last year," noted ARRL Volunteer Examiner Coordinator (VEC) Manager Maria Somma, AB1FM, "but this is the fifth year in a row the total has been greater than 31,000. I predict that the number of new licensees will be more than 30,000 at the end of this year as well, and I'm optimistic this trend will continue."

Upgrades also are down slightly, compared to last year -- 9,456 in 2018 versus 9,576 in 2017, she added. "For the fifth year in a row, we have conducted more than 7,000 Amateur Radio exam sessions in a year -- an important milestone for the ARRL VEC," Somma recounted. "Our program continues to provide outstanding service to the ARRL, its members, and the entire Amateur Radio community."

ARRL VEC filed a total 30,393 license application forms last year, compared to 31,014 in 2017. That includes new, upgrade, modification, renewal, and club station filings. At 7,035 in 2018, the number of exam sessions conducted by ARRL VEC marginally trailed the 7,075 held in 2017. ARRL VEC served 34,493 exam applicants in 2018, compared to 35,352 in 2017. Exam elements administered by ARRL decreased from 47,152 last year to 45,817 this year, Somma said. Nearly 1,800 new Volunteer Examiners (VEs) have been added to the ARRL VEC program.

-ARRL Letter

 

 

 

 

 

WWV 100th Anniversary Special Event Operation in the Planning Stages


It's a celebratory year for the WWV stations. The fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget -- once signed -- will include full funding for the stations, which also mark their 100th year this fall. The WWV Centennial Committee has a tentative agreement with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to mount a special event station this fall adjacent to the WWV site in Colorado to mark the 100th anniversary of the time and frequency standard station, the world's oldest continuously operating radio station. A memorandum of understanding is in the works.

-ARRL Letter

 

Radio History: A Century of Amateur Radio and the ARRL

Look at this "history" of ham radio through the eyes of the ARRL, an interesting read!

 

Check into our sister net, the Georgia Traffic and Emergency Net
nightly at 7:15 PM Eastern on 3982.5 mHz
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Georgia Cracker Radio Club
Meets on 3995 mornings at 7




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